Michael Mosley’s widow vows to continue husband’s work

By Aleks Phillips and Noor Nanji, BBC News

Michael Mosley’s widow has vowed to continue the TV health expert’s work, while thanking fans for their “wonderfully supportive messages” over his death.

Writing on Instagram for the first time since her husband went missing, Dr Clare Bailey Mosley said his family “miss him so much”.

The 67-year-old father-of-four went missing on 5 June while on holiday on the Greek island of Symi.

His disappearance sparked a five-day search, before his body was discovered on a hillside along the coastline from where he and his wife had been staying.

Mosley was first reported missing after he went for a walk without his phone. Setting off in the early afternoon, he had walked across rocky terrain in intense heat.

His body was found by the manager of a nearby bar.

Bailey Mosley said in her message that she was “going to be quiet for a while” but would return to social media as “I very much want to continue the work that gave Michael and myself so much joy and such a sense of purpose”.

Posting a picture of her late husband, she added: “Michael was an amazing man. Thank you for seeing that too. We miss him so much.”

Dr Michael Mosley in 'Australia's Sleep Revolution'.

For two decades, Mosley had worked as a health presenter, documentary maker, journalist and author.

He was known for his TV programmes including Trust Me, I’m a Doctor, and BBC Radio 4’s Just One Thing podcast.

Mosley popularised the 5:2 and the Fast 800 diets, which advocate intermittent fasting and low-carbohydrate meals.

Mosley’s death prompted an outpouring of tributes from both colleagues and members of the public.

Among them were many who have spoken about how he inspired them to change their lives.

Chris van Tulleken, one of Mosley’s co-presenters on Trust Me, I’m A Doctor, described him as “one of the most important broadcasters of the last few decades”.

For publisher Emma Waring, his Fast 800 recipes taught her how to eat “in a way that allowed me to lose weight while still enjoying satisfying and delicious food”.

Reacting to his death, she wrote: “I am >6.5 stone lighter and healthier for life thanks to him. Sad, sad news.”

Mosley’s programmes and books were watched, listened to and read by millions of people.

For those who feared the growing waistline bulge over a straining belt was just an inevitable and depressing part of life, his cheerful, experimental approach to better health offered a solution that seemed to work for many.

Bailey Mosley wrote in her message that the “outpouring of love from so many people has meant a huge amount to me and my family”.

This story was originally published by BBC News.

According to the news on Radio New Zealand

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